Skip to main content

Interchange of Degrees of Comparison – Positive Degree and Comparative Degree | Degree Change

The degrees of adjective are some adjective of qualities. These words intensify the qualities of a noun or a pronoun.

Interchange of Degrees of Comparison | Degree Change


Classification of Degrees of Comparison:

There are three types of degrees of comparison -

  1. Positive Degree,
  2. Comparative Degree and 
  3. Superlative Degree.


Positive Degree:

The positive degree is the simplest form of adjective.

E.g. – young, big.

● I am young

● This house is big.


Comparative Degree:

It is the form of adjective which is used to make comparison between two persons or animals or things.

E.g. – younger, bigger.

● I am younger than he. 

● This house is bigger than that house.


Superlative Degree:

This form of adjective is used to make comparison between more than two persons or objects.

E.g. – youngest, biggest.

● I am the youngest son of my family.  

● This house is the biggest house in the city.



Rules to Change the Degrees of Comparison:

Interchange of Positive Degree and Comparative Degree:


Positive Degree to Comparative Degree

Rule 1:

(I) The object of positive becomes the subject of comparative;

The subject of positive becomes the object of comparative.


(II) In case a pronoun is used as the subject of a positive degree, the pronoun will be used in comparative degree as the object in nominative case.

Never use me, us, him, her, them, rather use I, we, he, she, they.

...better than him. ❌

...better than he. ✅

Read more: Noun and Case.


Rule 2:

The sense or meaning should be the same in both the sentences (the sentence with positive degree and the sentence with comparative degree.)

To keep the sense unchanged, 

An affirmative positive degree is changed to negative comparative degree.

A negative positive degree is changed to affirmative Comparative degree.


Steps to Change Positive Degree to Comparative Degree:

Let’s have a look at an example below—

Positive – Jack is as good as John. (Turn into comparative degree.)


Now follow the steps to change the positive degree to comparative –

Step 1:

Write the object of positive degree as the subject of comparative.

John...


Step 2:

Use a suitable verb after the subject of comparative (here the verb is a be verb).

John is...

(‘Suitable’ = according to the number, person of the subject and tense of the verb of  positive degree.)


Step 3:

Omit as...as or so... as.


Step 4:

Put the comparative degree of the adjective (here it is ‘good’ is changed to 'better').

John is better... 

(‘better’ is the comparative degree for ‘good’; good-better-best)


Step 5:

Use ‘than’ after the comparative degree of the adjective.

John is better than...


Step 6:

Put the subject of positive as the object of comparative (here ‘Jack’). 

John is better than Jack.

Nice!

Wait...

Jack is as good as John and John is better than Jack— are not the same in the sense. Both the sentences have different meanings. To keep the sense unchanged we have make the comparative degree negative.

So, the final step is –


Step 7:

Put a not after the comparative degree marker (here ‘better’).

John is not better than Jack.

This is the actual answer.


Now we see that “Jack is as good as John” and “John is not better than Jack”— both the sentences are same in meaning/sense. 


The sentence with the positive degree has-

A subject (Jack), a be verb (is), positive degree of adjective (good), an object (John)

The sentence with comparative degree has

A subject (John), verb (is), comparative degree of adjective (better), an object (Jack).


Other Examples:–

Positive – She is as poor as I am.

Comparative – I am not poorer than she.


Positive – I am not so tall as he is.

Comparative – He is taller than I am.


Positive – Golf is not so popular as football.

Comparative – Football is more popular than golf.


Positive – She is as handsome as her sister.

Comparative – Her sister is not handsomer than she.


Read more: Degree words- Positive, Comparative, and Superlative forms of adjective.



Comparative Degree to Positive Drgree

Rule 1:

(I) The object of comparative becomes the subject of positive;

The subject of comparative becomes the object of positive.

(II) In case a pronoun is used as the subject of a comparative degree, the same pronoun will be used in positive degree as the object in nominative case.—

Never use me, us, him, her, them, rather use I, we, he, she, they.

...as good as him. ❌

...as good as he. ✅


Read more: Grammatical Case Nominative Case, Objective Case, Possessive Case. 



Rule 2:

The sense or meaning should be the same in both the sentences (the sentence with positive degree and the sentence with comparative degree.)

To keep the sense unchanged, –

An affirmative comparative degree is changed to negative positive degree.

A negative comparative degree is changed to affirmative positive degree.


Steps  to Change Comparative Degree to Positive Degree

She was more intelligent than he. (Turn into positive degree)

Step 1:

Write the object of comparative degree as the subject of Positive.

He...


Step 2:

Use a suitable verb after the subject of Positive (here the verb is a be verb).

He was...

(‘Suitable’ = as per the number, person of the subject and tense of the verb of  positive degree.)


Step 3:

Add as...as or so...as.

He is as...as ...

Note: Use as...as in affirmative sentence. And use so...as in negative sentence


Step 4:

Put the positive degree of the adjective (here ‘more intelligent’) between so/as and as.

He was so intelligent as ...

(‘intelligent’ is the positive degree for ‘more intelligent’.)


Step 5:

Omit ‘than’ after the comparative degree of the adjective.

He is so intelligent as... ('than' is omitted.)


Step 6:

Put the subject of comparative as the object of positive (here ‘she’). 

He is so intelligent as she.

(Here, the object is 'she', not 'her' because, here we have to use the nominative case of the pronoun as the object.)

Read more: Noun and Case.


Step 7:

Put a ‘not’ after the verb (here it is a be verb- ‘is’) to keep the meaning unchanged.

Positive – He is not so intelligent as she.


Other examples:–

Comparative – He is better than I.

Positive – I am not so good as he.


Comparative – This tree is larger than that.

Positive – That tree is not so large as this.


Comparative – She is not taller than her sister.

Positive – Her sister is as tall as she.


Comparative – Football is more interesting than cricket.

Positive – Cricket is not so interesting as Football.


Comparative – He eats more than I.

Positive – I do not eat as much as he does.


Now practice- 

Interchange of Degrees Exercises


Read more: Degree words- Positive, Comparative, and Superlative forms of adjective.


Read more: Interchange of Positive Degree and Comparative Degree


Read more: Interchange of Positive Degree and Superlative Degree.


Read more: Interchange of Comparative Degree and Superlative Degree.


Thank you...


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Active and Passive Voice of WH Questions | Rules to Change the Voice of WH Questions

Some of us have confusions with changing the voice of a WH question . Here are some rules to change the voice of a WH question easily. It may help you a lot. Before going ahead, make sure that you have read Farming Questions with WH words  and the basic rules to change the voice . Active and Passive Voice of WH Questions Change the Voice of a Question Starting in  Who   Active – Who plays football? (– in this sentence, who is used as the subject . And the answer of who will also be the subject of answer statement.)  Anyway, let's have a look at the - Steps to Turn an Active WH Question Starting in 'Who' into a Passive Voice :- Step 1 :  As usual, use the object of active as the subject of passive . Passive –  “ Football ...” Step 2 : Use a suitable be-verb after the passive subject . "Football is..." But, because it is an interrogative sentence , we have to use the be-verb before the passive subject . Passive –  “ Is football...”

How to Change the Narration of WH Questions with Examples | Direct and Indirect Speech Rules for WH Questions

There are two types of interrogative sentence – Yes-No questions and Wh questions . A Yes-No question can be answered simply with a ‘Yes’ or a ‘No’ while a WH question is to be answered with other word or words or a complete sentence (except ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ ). Here we’ll discuss what will be the indirect narration when the reported speech of a direct narration is a wh question . Read more: How to Change the Narration (basic level ) . Read more: How to frame wh questions . Narration Change of WH Questions Mainly  four  types of WH question are there, the structures are given below- Structures – #1:   WH + verb + object + ?   E.g.- Who did it? #2:   WH + helping verb + subject + verb + ?   E.g.-   What do you want? #3:   WH + helping verb + main verb + object + ?  E.g.- When did you make it? #4:   WH + noun + helping + subject + verb + ?  E.g.-  Which book do you want? *** At first please note that an  indirect speech  ( or narration ) is always an  Assertive Sentence

Use of Modal Auxiliary Verbs > can, could, will, would, shall, should, may, might, must, used to, ought, dare, need.

Hope, you are good today. Here we are going to discuss Modal Auxiliary Verbs ,  which are- can, could, will, would, shall, should, may, might, must, used to, aught, dare to, need... Modal Auxiliary Verb এর ব্যবহার     * Modal is the adjective of mode .    A modal verb is used in a sentence as an helping verb , to express someone's mood (ability, possibility, to take and give permissions etc). Use of a Modal Verb in a Sentence-  Affirmative - Subject + modal verb + main verb + object. Negative -   Subject +  modal verb  + not + main verb + object. Interrogative - Modal verb + subject + main verb + object. Examples:- 1. Can (পারা):   Can   -এর ব্যবহার: Can is used to express- O ne’s ability to do something:[কেউ কিছু করার ক্ষমতা রাখে,- এটা বোঝাতে can ব্যবহার করা হয়।] E.g.- I can do this. (আমি এটি করতে পারি।) They can win. (তারা জিততে পারে।) For negative sentences , use a ' not'  after 'can' . [ Negative sentence তৈরী করতে হলে can